Save The Date: VanHAC 2018!


Hockey-Graphs is once again excited to be co-hosting the Vancouver Hockey Analytics Conference for its third year! We will be working with the Vancouver Canucks, Simon Fraser University and the great team at

This year we’ll have a 3 day conference, with 2 days of talks, tutorials, keynotes and great discussions. There will also be plenty of social events throughout the weekend.

All knowledge levels are welcome.  If you are interested, you are more than welcome! Nobody will be turned away, everyone is encouraged to attend.

Date: March 2nd to 4th, 2018

Location: Downtown Vancouver, Canada


The Call for Presentations is currently open with a deadline of January 8th, 2018.  See the website for more details or go here to submit your talk. 

Registration has yet to open as we tabulate the final costs to host the venue, among other factors. Check back here or on Twitter, or add yourself to our mailing list, for more information on when it will open. (Note: Expect participants to be capped at around ~175 people.)

Watch the VanHAC page for updates as they are released!

Hockey-Graphs Podcast Episode 8: Market Efficiency and Diminishing returns

Shawn Ferris joined Adam Stringham to discuss some of his work over the last year including: his piece on whether shot parity is increasing, a look at how teams relying on high percentage changes are less consistent in their expected goal output and some of his upcoming works. Any comments are appreciated, the goal is to produce a podcast that people want to hear. Please subscribe to the podcast on iTunes!

#RITHAC 2017 Slides & Video

Yesterday, the third annual Rochester Institute of Technology Hockey Analytics Conference was held. Below are links to the slides for each presenter, as well as links to a stream of the morning and afternoon sessions. Please refer to this post for the time of each person’s talk or panel. More detailed recaps are undoubtedly coming from people, so this is simple a reference for streams and slides for those that missed the event or would like to revisit certain talks.

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About that Flyers challenge last night…

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Last night Dave Hakstol and the Flyers were the first team to get burned by the NHL’s new offside challenge rule. With a one-goal lead over Nashville and just 2:41 left in the 3rd period, Philadelphia was dinged for not one but two minor penalties at the same time. And on the ensuing 5-on-3 power play, Scott Hartnell banged in a loose puck to tie the game up.

Philly, however, decided there was something not quite right about Hartnell’s goal. They thought that Filip Forsberg may have snuck into the offensive zone just slightly ahead of the puck on the zone entry that preceded the tying marker. The Flyers decided to challenge, hoping that video review would negate the Preds’ goal and put them back on top with just under two minutes to play.

When news first came out of the league’s proposal to change the rules, there was a lot of skepticism that it would act as much of a deterrent to frivolous challenges. While no coach wants to see their team go on the penalty kill after conceding a goal, the odds were still stacked pretty heavily in favour of challenging even in low probability scenarios. In a normal even-strength situation, your probability of success doesn’t need to be all that high in order to make a challenge worthwhile, in fact you’re safe challenging a lot of the time with less than a 25% certainty of success.
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