Team Single Season Charts (1952-53 to present)

by Benjamin Wendorf

Every NHL team, every NHL season has a story. Whether it was a strong start to a weak finish, or great goaltending that bailed them out, or solid play and zero puck luck, these stories add up to build our broader ideas of the league, our team histories, and how we remember them. With a wealth of single season data presented in cumulative and 20-game moving average charts below, we can look back and see the exact moment that Adam Oates and Cam Neely clicked in Boston, or when Grant Fuhr went down with an injury and gave nearly 30-year old journeyman Dominik Hasek his first real starting role with the Sabres. These charts can open inquiries as much as satisfy them: what caused the Washington Capitals’ offense to take off (and defense to become so staunch) in the latter half of 1993-94? Or the Bruins’ possession to fall in 1975-76?

Don’t know where to start looking for these kinds of questions? Check out our historical possession and historical team shooting charts, which present all these single seasons together in a longer lens to help portray the peaks and valleys of franchise performance.

Each of the NHL franchises have a page to avoid clutter and overwork on the site; I’m also considering adding rough timelines to help aid the kinds of discoveries I mentioned above. The franchises (active teams in bold):

If you need help with learning how to use the graphs, or troubleshooting, or have questions, suggestions, or data requests, please check out our tutorial.

One thought on “Team Single Season Charts (1952-53 to present)

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